Join Our Whatsapp and Telegram Channel to Get Free eBooks Telegram | Whatsapp

Reverse CAMP test Principle, Procedure, Result

Reverse CAMP test

  • The full form of reverse CAMP test is reverse Christie-Atkinson-Munch-Peterson test.
  • Hansen used the synergistic relationship between the two microbes such as Clostridium perfringens and Group B Streptococcus to develop a test, which known as Reverse CAMP test.
  • This test is used for the differentiation of Clostridium perfringens from other Clostridium species. 
  • In this method, the CAMP factor produced by S. agalactiae is used to detect the Clostridium perfringens from other Clostridium species, that’s why this method is termed as a reverse CAMP test.

Objective of Reverse CAMP test 

Reverse CAMP test Principle

In this method, the Group B Streptococcus (CAMP test positive) is streaked in the center of sheep blood agar, and Clostridium perfringens is streaked perpendicular to it. Then the plate is incubated at 37oC for 24-48 hours in anaerobic conditions, an “arrowhead” hemolysis is seen between the growth of Clostridium perfringens and Group B Streptococcus. The “arrowhead” hemolysis is seen because an alpha-toxin is produced by Clostridium perfringens which interacts with CAMP factor and produces synergistic hemolysis.

Material Required for Reverse CAMP test 

  • CAMP positive S. agalactiae.
  • Blood agar
  • Petri Plate
  • Clostridium perfringens 
  • Incubator

Reverse CAMP test Procedure

  1. Streak the culture of CAMP positive S. agalactiae on the blood agar plate.
  2. Then Streak the Suspected clostridial culture at the right angle to the streak of S. agalactiae (avoid touching the streak of S. agalactia).
  3. Incubate the plate at 37°C for 24hours, anaerobically.
  4. After incubation observes the zone of hemolysis pointing toward S. agalactiae.

Reverse CAMP test Result

A positive reaction of Clostridium perfringens results in a “bow-tie” zone of enhanced hemolysis pointing towards Streptococcus agalactiae (group B).

reverse camp test result
Reverse Christie, Atkins, Munch-Petersen (CAMP) test. Arcanobacterium haemolyticum is streaked on a blood agar plate. Staphylococcus aureus is then streaked perpendicular to the Arcanobacterium path. A positive reverse CAMP test result is indicated (arrow).

Reverse CAMP test positive organisms

Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, Corynebacterium ulcerans, Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, C. perfringens.

References

  • https://healthjade.net/camp-test/
  • http://microbesinfo.com/2013/07/camp-test-christie-atkins-and-munch-peterson-test/
  • https://microbiologynotes.com/reverse-camp-test-for-the-identification-of-clostridium-perfringens/
  • https://www.basu.org.in/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/CAMP_Tests__Standard_and_Rapid__and_Reverse_CAMP_test.pdf

Related Posts

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pineapple Under Microscope A new weapon in the battle against antibiotic resistance 16 Important Skills Needed For A Successful Career in Bioinformatics Top 5 High-Paying Biotech Jobs in India (No PhD Required) Top Emerging Trends in Bioinformatics Important Skills Needed For A Successful Career in Bioinformatics Research reveals plant pathogens repurpose phage elements for bacterial warfare Scientists show the key role of spleen and extracellular vesicles in cryptic malaria infections Scientists reveal molecular link between glucose sensing and pyroptosis cell death Scientists reconstruct ancient genomes of the two most deadly malaria parasites to identify origin and spread
Pineapple Under Microscope A new weapon in the battle against antibiotic resistance 16 Important Skills Needed For A Successful Career in Bioinformatics Top 5 High-Paying Biotech Jobs in India (No PhD Required) Top Emerging Trends in Bioinformatics Important Skills Needed For A Successful Career in Bioinformatics Research reveals plant pathogens repurpose phage elements for bacterial warfare Scientists show the key role of spleen and extracellular vesicles in cryptic malaria infections Scientists reveal molecular link between glucose sensing and pyroptosis cell death Scientists reconstruct ancient genomes of the two most deadly malaria parasites to identify origin and spread

Adblocker detected! Please consider reading this notice.

We've detected that you are using AdBlock Plus or some other adblocking software which is preventing the page from fully loading.

We don't have any banner, Flash, animation, obnoxious sound, or popup ad. We do not implement these annoying types of ads!

We need money to operate the site, and almost all of it comes from our online advertising.

Please add biologynotesonline.com to your ad blocking whitelist or disable your adblocking software.

×